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Miramichi Fishing Report for Thursday, July 26, 2012

Unfortunately, most of the news this week is not the kind anglers like to hear.  Low water, warm water and closures are the main topics.  Due to lack of rain and warm water temperatures, DFO has had to close a number of cold-water pools to help protect the salmon and grilse.

A list of closures is as follows:

SALMON FISHERY ON THE MIRAMICHI
Moncton – July 20, 2012 – Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) today announces that the following salmon fishing pools will be closed to fishing, for cause of high water temperature and low water levels, starting Monday, July 23, 2012:

  • Confluence of Salmon Brook and Cains River, and the waters of Salmon Brook upstream from its confluence with the Cains River to South Cains River Road;
  • Confluence of Otter Brook and Cains River;
  • Confluence of Sutherland Brook and Northwest Miramichi River, and Sutherland Brook upstream to the Highway 420;
  • Confluence of Butty’s Brook and Renous River, and the waters of Butty’s Brook from its confluence with the Renous River to South Renous Road;
  • Waters of the Southwest Miramichi River in Quarryville, 300 m upstream and 300 m downstream of the Quarryville Bridge, including Indian Town Brook from its confluence with the Southwest Miramichi River, upstream to Highway 108 bridge;
  • Confluence of Wilson Brook and Southwest Miramichi River, including the waters of Wilson Brook upstream 100 m of its mouth;
  • Waters of the Southwest Miramichi River surrounding the pump house located at N 46.86483, W 65.67698 (WGS 84);
  • Confluence of Gray Rapids Brook and Southwest Miramichi River, and the waters of Gray Rapids upstream from its confluence with the Southwest Miramichi River to Route 118;
  • Confluence of Morse Brook and Southwest Miramichi River, and the waters of Morse Brook upstream from its confluence with the Southwest Miramichi River to Howard Road;
  • Confluence of Black Brook and Southwest Miramichi River, and the waters of Black Brook upstream from its confluence with the Southwest Miramichi River to South Cains River Road;
  • Confluence of Donnelly Brook and Southwest Miramichi River, and the waters of Donnelly Brook upstream from its confluence with the Southwest Miramichi River to the South Road Bridge;
  • Confluence of Betts Mills Brook and Southwest Miramichi River, and the waters of Betts Mills Brook upstream from its confluence with the Southwest Miramichi River to Highway # 8;
  • Confluence of Porcupine Brook and Southwest Miramichi River, and the waters of Porcupine Brook upstream from its confluence with the Southwest Miramichi River to Story Town Road;
  • Confluence of Big Hole Brook and Southwest Miramichi River;
  • Confluence of Mill Brook and Southwest Miramichi River.

Please refer to Gulf Variation Order 2012-054 for further details.  The Fishery Closures / Variation Orders Registry are available online at:
http://www2.glf.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/fam-gpa/cp/ord/index-e.php

For more information please contact your local DFO office.

Steve Palmer with a nice salmon and a very good cigar to boot.

The bit of rain we did get on Monday did help, particularly on the Northwest, but generally the further up the Main Southwest one went, the lesser the amounts of rain.  As such we still need a couple of days of steady rain that will soak in rather than run off.  That and cooler temperatures, especially at night, will bring conditions closer to normal.

There are fewer numbers of both salmon and grilse compared to the last two years, and even with the numbers we do have, the percentage of salmon are quite high compared to grilse in the system.  So over all, anglers are still wait5ing and hoping for a big late run of fish, especially grilse.

There are some fresh fish coming in each day in dribs and drabs.  The counting fence at Millerton on the Main Southwest is reporting an average of 20 fish a day with 10 grilse and 10 salmon.  The Cassilis Net on the Northwest is reporting a lower daily average with about seven grilse and seven salmon.  Over all counts to July 15 are given toward the end of this report.

Doug White’s Tammerack Sports Fly Shop in Juniper said the river there is low and warm.  In spite of the weatherman’s empty promises, the skies are clear with no rain in sight. There are a few people still flailing away (hope springs eternal) but the majority of people that come in to gear up are going somewhere else.

The flies of choice for the dedicated masses are: Various Bugs in size 8 and 10. Stone flies and Jigaboos in size 8 and Bombers of various sizes and colors

W. W. Doak and Sons in Doaktown said on Tuesday they had hardly had enough rain to wet the ground.  The water was on the low side with temperatures creeping to the high side.  Most of the tributaries were quite low.  There had been a few good days late last week, but since then the catching had been slow.  Anglers were hooking more salmon than grilse.

Flies of choice were Green Butt Bear Hairs, Undertakers, Shady Ladies and White-tailed Green Machines on nos. 8 & 10 hooks, along with a variety of Bombers and Dry Flies.

Derek Munn of Ledges Inn in Doaktown and Mountain Channel in the Rapids area said angling was very slow.  They had received maybe a 3-inch raise in water by Wednesday, and were only picking up a few fish in the cold-water pools.  Rain was desperately needed, and the immediate forecast doesn’t look good.

Flies of choice were Smurfs in the wets, and Dry Flies and Bombers.

Herb Barry Sr. of Herb’s Fly Shop on the Station Road in Blackville said angling was very poor with only the odd fish being hooked and those were before the closures.  The water was fishably low, and very warm, and the closures were a good thing for the benefit of the fish.  A good soaking rain was needed.

Flies of choice were mostly Dry Flies and Bombers such as Killer Whiskers, Rat-Faced McDougalls, Royal Wulffs and White Wulffs.

Curtis Miramichi River Outfitting in Blackville said angling was certainly not the best with only a very few fish hooked all week.  The water was low and warm.  Kayaking and canoeing on the Main Southwest was good.  Generally, a good rain was badly needed.

Flies of choice were Blue Smurf and a peach-coloured Carter’s Bug that was “rolling a lot of fish”.

George Routledge of George’s Fly Shop at the Mouth of Renous in Quarryville said angling was very, very slow.  There had hardly been a fish taken until Tuesday evening when anglers caught two salmon and a grilse at the Mouth of Renous.  A little raise in wat6er had started some moving, but they were not taking well and definitely “on the move”.  George said the water was a medium height after the rain, but dropping on Wednesday

Flies of choice were those with a lot of “blue” such as Blue Smurfs, Blue Charms and Blue Bombers.

Jim Laws of Miramichi Hunting and Fishing in Newcastle, Miramichi reported angling as “pretty slow” with water conditions “low and warm”.  The rain seemed to miss most of the rivers and more was definitely needed.

Flies of choice were White-tailed Green Machines in wets, and Dry Flies and Bombers, especially those with orange.

Syd Matchett of Trout Brook Fly Shop on the Northwest Miramichi said the water raised a foot on both the Northwest and Sevogle Rivers so that by Wednesday the water conditions were good both in height and temperature.  Despite one angler hooking four Salmon on Tuesday morning, there were not a lot of fish being seen or hooked.  Most of the Crown Reserve Stretches were not having great success either.

Flies of choice were Shady Ladies, Yellow-winged Butterflies and White-tailed Green Machines.

Debbie Norton of Upper Oxbow Outdoor Adventures on the Little Southwest Miramichi was unavailable for comment this week.

So, the Northwest seems to have been the only river that did receive a decent amount of rain, and even there, the numbers of fish were not great.  A good two-day rain is definitely needed to freshen the rivers and there by perhaps bring in decent numbers of fresh fish.  Then we can get out and “on the water”.

This is David Rance from the UK with a nice hen salmon taken on #6 Cascade

Don’t forget to show your support for our sponsors, because without them, this column would not be possible. 

Check out Deals 4 U in Miramichi for your grocery needs, and good Cuban cigars to celebrate getting back to the rivers.

Drop in Bryant Freeman’s Eskape Anglers in Riverview to stock up on streamers for spring angling as well as any other equipment you may need such as a Reddington Rod.

Miramichi City Surplus on the outskirts of Miramichi in the Lower Derby road offers a nice range of rods, reels, tackle, bait and other outdoors supplies and hunting needs.  Be sure to also bring along your recyclables.

ANY FINANCIAL CONTRIBUTATIONS TOWARD HELPING WITH THIS COLUMN ARE GREATLY APPRECIATED: Click here to donate now. A SPECIAL THANKS to all who have already made contributions.

Thought for the Week: “The only reason I ever played golf in the first place was so that I could afford to hunt and fish.”  Sam Snead

E-MAIL:
As requested by some members of the Dieppe Fly Tying Club last Spring, we are trying to organize a bus to assist the Fly Fishing Show in Somerset, New Jersey, next January. The Somerset Fly Fishing Show is the biggest Fly Fishing show in the world!

We have found a Passenger Bus that can drive up to 55 people to the show. Here is the itinerary and information:
Date: Leaving Thursday January 24th, 2013 early in the morning and returning Sunday January 27th
Lodging: Each participant or group will reserve their own room (3 nights) at the Doubletree Somerset Hotel
Admission at the show : 25$ for two days pass
Cost for the travel (bus): 125$/person…the Club will pay the difference if we cannot reach 55 participants
Others : You need a valid passport and now we can bring back up to 800$ worth of merchandise

Before we reserve the bus, I am doing a survey on how many of us would be interested by such a road trip. Can you reply to me your interest by mid August? For now, you can invite a friend or 2 because I don’t think we can fill the bus only with our members. So let me know if you will be alone or with someone. My goal is to finalize the reservation of the Passenger bus in September for you to reserve your room early.
Thanks
Jacques Héroux
tél: 506-855-7298
Cel: 506-874-0196
jacques@salmosalar.info
www.salmosalar.info

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MSA Welcomes Sturgeon to MSCC
By Miramichi Salmon Association on July 17, 2012
The Miramichi Salmon Association is pleased to announce that an arrangement has been concluded with a sturgeon aquaculture company, Breviro Caviar, to lease part of the facilities at the Miramichi Salmon Conservation Centre (MSCC) in South Esk, NB.  The project will grow and culture short-nose sturgeon (Acipenser brevirostrum) for both meat and caviar.  Atlantic sturgeon and short-nose sturgeon have played an important role in the history of the aboriginal people of the Miramichi and today wild populations are species of concern throughout its range.  Aquaculture has proven to be an effective way to provide the highly sought after benefits of sturgeon caviar and meat.  In Europe, intensive stocking programs have also helped revive and sustain their native sturgeon species from going extinct.

The MSCC is maintaining its full salmon stocking program that has been in effect for the past few years and will also be involved in stocking sea-run brook trout in the Miramichi.  The revenue from the lease will be used to enhance the MSA field programs.  It will also help us to contemplate an expansion of the facilities at the MSCC to meet specific objectives that were not possible in the past.

The sturgeon began arriving at the MSCC on June 20 and will be concluded by the first week of July.  The sturgeon may be viewed by the public as part of our hatchery tour, subject to the operational activities and approval of Breviro Caviar.

Salmon and Grilse numbers still down at barriers as of July 15th
By Miramichi Salmon Association on July 17, 2012

The numbers of salmon and grilse that have landed at the Northwest and Dungarvon Barriers are still down in comparison to the same time last year.

The Northwest Barrier has seen only 176 salmon and grilse compared to 611 the same time last year. Brook trout numbers are down as well. Totals as of July 15th are shown below.

Grilse  (to 63 cm) Small Salmon (64-84 cm)  Large Salmon (>84 cm)   Total Small &  Large    All  Atlantic Salmon Brook Trout
2012 Total to Date     68      60     48     108     176   724
Previous Year     444      110     57     167    611   1142

_____________________________________________________________________________________

Grilse and salmon numbers are both low at the Dungarvon Barrier with only 164 in total arriving at the barrier as of July 15th compared to 572 the same time last year. Brook trout numbers are up compared to last year with 54 arriving to date compared to 24 in 2011.

Grilse  (to 63 cm) Small Salmon (64-84 cm)  Large Salmon (>84 cm)   Total Small &  Large    All  Atlantic Salmon Brook Trout
2012 Total to Date
    95      20      49     69      164    54
Previous Year     391      54      127     181     572    24

 

Reward Offered for Salmon Tag
By Miramichi Salmon Association on July 17, 2012

In April 2012, the Miramichi Salmon Association (MSA), in partnership with the Atlantic Salmon Federation (ASF) tagged 10 large Atlantic salmon kelt with pop-up satellite tags in an effort to help determine where these fish are migrating and feeding when they return to the ocean and where losses are occurring. Nine of the ten tagged salmon left the river for the ocean and if they survived, would return again this summer or most likely, return next year.

Pop-up satellite tag on salmon

Pop-up satellite tags provide a record of where the fish travels and the temperatures and depths they are migrating through as they feed in the ocean. The data is logged hourly in the tag and when the fish dies or the study ends, the tag pops off, floats to the surface and transmits the data to a satellite receiver. The tags however will only pop off in salt water. Thus salmon returning to the river this summer will maintain their tag.

Our receivers have identified one fish as having returned to the Northwest Miramichi. It was picked up at 5:45 pm on Friday July 13th at the Northwest Mill Stream and then again at 6:15 pm at the Cassilis trap net and it is believed to be in the Northwest Miramichi, hopefully holding in a cold water pool.

It is very important to the MSA and ASF to recover the tags and we do have staff searching the river with portable receivers hoping to pick up the transmitter again. There is a chance though that the salmon will be angled, thus we are offering a $200 reward to anyone that returns the tag to us. The tag is large and is attached to the dorsal fin. If you do catch the fish with this device please handle the fish very carefully, remove the device, return the salmon to the river, and contact us at 506.622.4000 to return the tag and collect your reward.

The information collected from pop up tags will help answer the question of where salmon are traveling and the reasons for the low returns of Atlantic salmon back to the Miramichi as well as other river systems in Atlantic Canada. This is a joint project between the Atlantic Salmon Federation and the Miramichi Salmon Association with funding from the New Brunswick Wildlife Trust Fund.

_____________________________________________________

Atlantic Salmon Federation News
Wednesday, July 18, 2012

New Logo and New www.asf.ca
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
ASF has a new logo, and an entirely new website to share information on wild Atlantic salmon.
http://asf.ca

Rivernotes Updated – see latest returns & rivers – plus REWARD
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Rivernotes provides a description of the new logo. On the RIVERS, the latest information on returns is startling in various regions – with good news for some and disappointment for others. And a REWARD is posted for a particular Miramichi salmon. Read the full story.
http://atlanticsalmonfederation.org/rivernotes

63 Rivers Closed in NL – But Some Just Reopened
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Due to water levels and temperatures, 63 rivers were closed, but as of July 18, some just reopened. ASF’s Don Ivany also explains why it is important not to stress the salmon, in a recent article.
http://asf.ca/closing-of-nl-rivers-about-protecting-salmon.html

Closing NS Mersey Biodiversity Facility a Bad Idea
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
A letter to DFO Minister Ashfield gives reasons why closing this home for Nova Scotia critically endangered Atlantic salmon populations is not in anyone’s interest.
http://asf.ca/bad-move-to-close-mersey-biodiversity-facility.html

450,000 ISA-Infected Salmon Not Headed to Supermarket
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
A Newfoundland company with condemned ISA farmed salmon asked to be able to market the product. After some time, permission was not granted.
http://asf.ca/450-000-isa-infected-salmon-not-headed-for-supermarket.html

Sad End to Connecticut Restoration Effort
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
The USFWS is ending this major project, the final straw being the small returns and the great damage from Tropical Storm Irene last year. Read more
http://asf.ca/sad-end-to-connecticut-river-restoration-effort.html

__________________________________________________

Hope you enjoy the post, I sure enjoyed the time on the river!

http://theriverscourse.blogspot.com/2012/07/two-weeks-on-miramichi-july-2012.html

Gary Tanner

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Cumulative counts to date of Salmon as of July 15

Graph of time series available by clicking on individual site name.

Period:                [July 15 \/]   Size Group:     [Salmon \/]   [View Counts]

River

Average
1994-1998

Average
1999-2003

Average
2004-2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

Restigouche River

1 – Upsalquitch Protection Barrier

230

218

158

214

192

359

2 – Little Main Counting Fence

*

12

*

Jacquet River

3 – Jacquet River Protection Barrier

6

*

*

22

30

111

39

Nepisiguit River

4 – Nepisiguit Counting Fence

*

*

*

123

Miramichi River

5 – Northwest Protection Barrier

114

112

104

50

224

167

108

6 – Northwest Cassilis Trapnet

*

79

53

83

171

270

114

7 – Southwest Millerton Trapnet

79

124

150

272

393

395

331

8 – Dungarvon Protection Barrier

84

61

82

100

138

181

69

9 – Southwest Juniper Barrier

75

107

150

152

250

184

Saint John River

10 – Mactaquac Dam

1076

635

273

339

296

379

81

11 – Fishway Tinker Dam

*

*

*

1

1

12 – Nashwaak River Counting Fence

*

25

41

105

72

143

28

Magaguadavic River

13 – St. George Fishway

*

1

*

St. Croix River

14 – Milltown Fishway

28

3

*

Sackville River

15 – Sackville River Counting Fence

*

3

3

3

16

9

3

LaHave River

16 – Morgan Falls Fishway

133

106

82

51

45

68

27

Note: ”*” indicates fewer than 5 years are available to calculate the mean.
Date of operation may vary from year to year

Cumulative counts to date of Grilse as of July 15

Graph of time series available by clicking on individual site name.

Period:                [July 15 \/]   Size Group:     [Grilse \/]   [View Counts]

River

Average
1994-1998

Average
1999-2003

Average
2004-2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

Restigouche River

1 – Upsalquitch Protection Barrier

304

187

250

73

317

311

2 – Little Main Counting Fence

*

27

*

Jacquet River

3 – Jacquet River Protection Barrier

10

*

*

17

18

135

83

Nepisiguit River

4 – Nepisiguit Counting Fence

*

*

*

108

Miramichi River

5 – Northwest Protection Barrier

271

204

278

19

488

444

68

6 – Northwest Cassilis Trapnet

*

483

243

119

1001

950

201

7 – Southwest Millerton Trapnet

382

521

648

305

1222

1256

356

8 – Dungarvon Protection Barrier

215

133

225

57

356

391

95

9 – Southwest Juniper Barrier

113

120

170

29

146

74

Saint John River

10 – Mactaquac Dam

1753

1013

835

216

1957

688

66

11 – Fishway Tinker Dam

*

*

*

3

4

12 – Nashwaak River Counting Fence

*

95

175

54

618

291

8

Magaguadavic River

13 – St. George Fishway

*

2

*

6

St. Croix River

14 – Milltown Fishway

7

4

*

Sackville River

15 – Sackville River Counting Fence

*

41

22

54

32

31

7

LaHave River

16 – Morgan Falls Fishway

594

278

395

143

240

255

18

Note: ”*” indicates fewer than 5 years are available to calculate the mean.
Date of operation may vary from year to year

Until next week

TIGHT LINES

DOUG

Giv'er Miramichi

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